Three New Features Of macOS Ventura That Are Really Useful

macOS Ventura has been released for a few days, and we have already seen that one of its top news has not convinced us at all. But Ventura is not just Stage Manager, in fact, it is perhaps in the little things that Apple’s new operating system gives its best.

So here are three novelties that have convinced us especially because they are useful and suitable for everyone., or not related to the use of iPhone or specific applications. So let’s leave the possibility schedule an email to be sent in the Mail app, or sharing a photo library via iCloud, and let’s take a look at something anyone using macOS can benefit from.

System Settings

System Settings
System Settings

System Preferences become System settings, but the name change is just the beginning because what really changes is the content. For the first time, in fact, all the settings are redesigned, with an organization that, as the screenshot above suggests, has a side navigation menu, with the content loaded on the right.

Previously we had the icons of the different elements altogether, and clicking on each of them opened the relative options.

It seems trivial, but the change is radical, and while it takes some getting used to it because now every macOS user almost knew by heart where the settings they used the most were, it’s a welcome change.

Why positive? Because meanwhile, they are there. many more explanations of what the multiple options present do, which now take advantage of the greater space available to be more understandable. There are fewer checkboxes and more toggles, meaning fewer “dry” things like you yourself understand what they do or manage, and more explanations.

In general, in addition, many options have been moved and/or reorganized, in order to have a general organization. more logical and intuitive.

What a pity not being able to climb again the window in width, which remains fixed, but only in height; and it’s a pity that even doing it doesn’t say that all the items are visible without scrolling. Here, maybe the look is what is missing in this new design, and also want the possibility of going from the detailed view of now to a single one with icons, it would have been optimal.

Despite this, we believe that the new configuration was necessary (in fact, it’s a shame Apple hasn’t revamped its content further), both conceptually and practically. For new users, for those who have never used macOS, they will surely be more complete than the previous ones; everyone else will have to get used to it. Will they be successful?

Spotlight

Spotlight
Spotlight

Personally, I started liking Spotlight late. I have used it for a long time Alfred to do everything I did with Spotlight (and more) because I found Apple’s toolbar too slow, but it was actually a sham.

Yes, because Spotlight, although it takes a while to load all the data it finds (which can be a lot), usually guesses the first time what you need most. In any case, the question is not this, but that Spotlight is now even more complete because it is enriched with search images even on the web.

Simply typing “cats” will have a ton of kitty photos pulled from the web or your Mac. And all of this later. maps, news, and definitions from the dictionary or Wikipedia; and then there are also related documents and research.

Ultimately, the feeling is that Spotlight, like Settings, was one of those elements that seemed eternal and immutable, and instead, fortunately, it continues to be the object of attention. And we hope it will receive even more, perhaps to make it faster, as we said at the beginning, or more intelligent (because if I type “dogs” it doesn’t find any images for me, while if I type “dog” it does?).

The bottom line is that Spotlight does a lot of things, even more, than you might need (from the settings, you can check things that aren’t needed for you): from currency/unit conversion to quick dictionary definitions to simple calculations. , to the banal launch of an application. There are so many everyday tasks you can get done faster with Spotlight – if you’ve never tried it, go for it!

It is one of those apps so “ancestral” and integrated into the operating system, that it is either very used or is it ignored (in my personal experience). If you belonged to the second group, macOS Ventura may be an opportunity to give it a new chance.

Login Items

Login items
Login items

Yes, like me, you are controlling and cleaning monsters the new item in System Settings -> General -> Login Items will make you happy.

Here, in fact, it is possible to choose which elements (ie application) you want they open automatically on each system access, and we could also do this on macOS 12, but above all, there is now a good list of applications that can run one or more elements in the background and for each of these you can, of course, deny this permission.

It’s a shame not to have more general control over these background activities: what are they? What are they doing? Why can’t they turn them off one by one? Other than that, though, it’s a great way to first find out which apps have background elements, and secondly, inhibit those you don’t want acting “behind your back.”

If your macOS seemed a bit slow and tired, starting from this screen may be a good idea. And every once in a while you can sneak a peek at it because you never know what new app might be running in the background without your knowledge.

Let’s just be clear that having a background service is not bad, it’s only like that if you don’t do anything about it and thus want to free up resources. So be careful not to wildly disable everything, but think about each app and, in case of problems, be prepared to reactivate removed features.

Also, read about Apple MacBook M2 Pro

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Abram left his e-business studies to devote himself to his entrepreneurial projects. In 2017, he created the company Inbound Media and wrote articles about high-tech products for his Chromebookeur site. In 2019, Chromebookeur was renamed Macbound and became a general purchasing advice site. Today, Abram manages the development and growth of Macbound, surrounded by a young and talented team.

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